Easter Island Turns to Tradition Against Covid 19

Rapa Nui (Easter Island), which is one of the most isolated islands on earth, is not immune to the Covid 19 virus. In fact, as of April 1, the island has confirmed another three cases of Covid-19 coronavirus, bringing its total to five.

An indigenous Rapa Nui resident said those affected are Chilean migrants who all live in the same house. Karen Rapu said she doesn’t know if they’re relatives or friends. “They are in quarantine in their home. The whole island is in quarantine. We are permitted to go out, only for important things, between 5am and 2pm. Some things like mini-markets, bank, gas station.”

Karen Rapu says they’re allowed to open between 8 and 12 in the morning but she’s not sure if this will continue given the new cases.

However, the Agence- France Presse (AFP) recently reported that inhabitants of Easter Island are leaning on a traditional form of ancestral discipline to overcome the coronavirus-imposed lockdown that threatens the Pacific island’s vital tourism sector, and consequently their livelihoods.

Situated 3,500 kilometers (2,200 miles) off the coast of Chile, the island of 7,750 people is renowned for its giant humanoid monoliths called moais that were sculpted from basalt more than 1,000 years ago.

The local population can ill afford the outbreak to spread with just one hospital and three ventilators on the island. Faced with this crisis, the locals have turned to the Tapu, an ancient tradition based on taking care of oneself that has been passed down through generations of the native Rapa Nui people.

“To accompany this self-care concept, we’re applying the Rapa Nui tradition, an ancestral rule based on sustainability and respect,” said the island’s mayor Pedro Edmunds. “It’s called Tapu. You can hear about this concept in all the Polynesian islands.”

19797-004-DB24898F

Where is Easter Island? Map from http://www.brittanica.com

Tapu is a complex concept related to secrecy, rules and prohibitions from which the English word “taboo” derives. “If you say the word Tapu to a Polynesian, they will immediately tell you why we have to do Tapu. That’s precisely because they know and understand what it signifies,” said Edmunds.

It means that the island’s lockdown has been diligently respected, leading to the virus being prevented from spreading far and wide. “We’ve applied the Tapu concept for all Rapa Nui and the acceptance has been incredible,” said Edmunds.

“The virus is contained in two families in the same area, so we know where they are, who they are, and they’ve been respecting the (isolation) protocols since the beginning,” Edmunds told AFP.

Plan B

With streets, beaches and parks deserted, the indigenous inhabitants have turned to the knowledge passed down through generations to deal with the crisis.

Some indigenous Rapa Nui inhabitants have already adapted to their new circumstances and started to cultivate their land, like their ancestors did, said Sabrina Tuki, who has worked in tourism for 20 years. “Our family and many families are already applying a Plan B and we’ve already started planting,” said Tuki, whose regular work has completely ground to a halt.

Everyone is worried about the coming months. Edmunds says the island’s inhabitants can last for a month with the borders closed. But at the end of April, 3,000 people “will be seen begging in the streets for food from some local or national authority, because they won’t be able to eat,” said Edmunds.

It won’t be the Rapa Nui, though, according to Edmunds, because the community has begun to rally together behind its concept of Tapu. But the island’s other inhabitants, who make up around half the population and mostly work in the service industry, will be in trouble.

The mayor doesn’t expect the recovery to come until August, when tourists would return to the islands. When it does restart, he’s expecting a reduced capacity compared to the two flights a week the island was welcoming until three weeks ago.

Only one airline, Latam, operated the five-hour flights from the continent, but like many airlines its business has been hard hit by the virus.

“We’re all affected; the whole chain, from the biggest agency to the craftsman,” said Samuel Atan, a hiking guide who says the crisis caught everyone unawares. The pandemic has highlighted the fragility of such a remote location. Without state subsidies, many could not survive, Edmunds says.

chile_easter_island-e1533212925801

Moais on Easter Island- picture from nationalpost.com

This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s